Back Button

RSS

suikodenrevival:

Some impressions from the Suikoden IV Pachislot machine that was released over two years ago. Including some images that you could unlock by playing a demoversion on the Konami website. For all Mitsuba lovers a must see!

rachaellikespink:

Wait…Can someone please explain to me why, in the manga, Hugo’s True Fire Rune is visible on the back of his hand, but Sasarai’s True Earth Rune isn’t visible on the back of his?

THIS IS ABSOLUTELY UNFORGIVABLE

THE INCONSISTENCY

I DEMAND AN EXPLANATION

Because in the manga both Sasarai and Luc’s runes are on their chests. You can see in the final volume during Luc’s flashbacks when they were babies. They also both clutch their chests when their runes act up.

The mangaka is pretty consistent about making the true runes visible on Hugo, Chris and Geddoe so this must have been a  deliberate choice. I don’t know why. Maybe it indicates their artificial natures, that they were created for the runes rather than being chosen by them? (the runes are at their hearts, so to speak)

Apr 5
littlewhinging:

still one of the best things ive ever seen.
slaughter melon reporting for duty.

littlewhinging:

still one of the best things ive ever seen.

slaughter melon reporting for duty.

sadal-suud:

poot

I must go. My planet needs me.

sadal-suud:

poot

I must go. My planet needs me.

proofofspirit:

SOOOoo i’ve always wondered what ratatosk from ToS2 looked like as a summon spirit, when he isn’t assuming aster’s form. so i decided to design one myself! since i’m silly, i also did a fake cut-in for ain soph aur. yeah! i had a lot of fun incorporating all the centurion cores into the design, as well as emil’s knight of ratatosk color palette. i could have gone with a more human-like design, like celsius, but then i was like, naaah, ratatosk’s a freakin’ squirrel in mythology. haha

idk if you guys like ToS2, but yeah.

Tales of the Abyss sidequest compendium

suudonym:

Tired of missing sidequests in Abyss, so I looked them up and separated out all the parts in chronological order.  I’m mostly posting it to save for my own reference but if anyone else wants to try to decipher and follow my vagueness then feel free.  It includes stuff that’s for second playthrough or higher.

Read More

pandanoi:

Attack on Titan by Noiry
DONE!OMG this took so much time! But I think it has worth it :D
Lineart by Pedro R.M. Andreo and colors by me ♥ 

pandanoi:

Attack on Titan by Noiry

DONE!
OMG this took so much time! But I think it has worth it :D

Lineart by Pedro R.M. Andreo and colors by me ♥ 

Feb 1

menfenced:

juvjuvychan:

crazyhead36:

amy-banner:

theworldismyoysterrr:

redkiteslongnights:

hatteress:

trixafaerie:

Two guys dancing El Tango de Roxanne

Dat. Finale.

I- I just- Holy shit.

This is…. this is unbelievable. 

perfection

NO BUT THIS IS LITERALLY ONE OF THE MOST COMPLICATED DANCES I’VE EVER SEEN AND THEY MAKE IT LOOK SO EASY

Holy shit.

I wanna send this to SYTYCD people like whoa

HOLY SHIT! I was expecting it to be good from the comments, but this actually blew my mind!

sistaofpeace1’s Ending Theory to Tales of the Abyss

sistaofpeace1:

backbutton:

sistaofpeace1:

Hello people and welcome to my ending theory to one of my favorite games of all time, Tales of the Abyss. Now, I completely and fully understand that the developers want players to basically come up with their own ending and just believe what they want. And it’s really Namco’s fault for trying to make the ending intentionally confusing and vague, however, I think there are many factors put in the game already that show what the developers truly intended—and that is what this post is about. I’ll admit, even after nearly eight years of trying to analyze the ending myself (I first beat the Japanese version of the game in Feb 2006), I’m still not 100% confident in my own theory and speculation due to Namco purposely not explaining some critical elements. But I’ll still share with you what I’ve come up with myself based on the game’s “science” and various dialogue said by certain characters—even what others deem to be “evidence” leaning toward other theories, but I will use those to show how it actually proves otherwise. So huge wall of text coming forth as I attempt to explain all of this in detail.

This post is divided up into the following:

I. In-game evidence (aka the Contamination Effect and the Big Bang)

II. Themes and the epilogue

III. In official supplementary materials

IV. Why other theories simply do not work

Read More

Reblogging for truths and so I don’t have to write this essay myself. Except I will now write some random additional things. This is pretty much exactly what I would say but a few extra bits so all my thoughts are in on one place.

1) Less theory and more like “what actually happened.” The whole “ambiguous” thing is just so ridiculous. In an ambiguous ending, both options get equal weight, both options complete the theme or message of the story (perhaps in opposite ways), and, most importantly, the creators of the story don’t have an answer. Tales of the Abyss clearly has an answer, is weighted in precisely one direction, and makes no sense thematically otherwise. The ending is not ambiguous in the slightest, it’s unexplained, and the player is encouraged to figure it out, not simply decide what they want.

Inception has an ambiguous ending. Either way you decide, the theme if the story, that “the dream is real to the one who dreams” is held up. The creators explicitly don’t know if the main character is dreaming at the end. The creators of Tales of the Abyss do know what happened, and only faffed around with what, exactly, would be shown to the player.

2) More on the ending being weighted toward Luke, I just have to question if people know how stories work. The game gives a problem: Luke is fated to die through the Big Bang. The theme of the game is Luke’s struggle to define himself and realize he needs no reason to exist, that just wanting to live is justification enough. Luke is set against his foil, Asch, who does not change as Luke does, in direct parallel.  When Asch is told (mistakenly) he will die, he becomes reckless and feels no escape from his fate. When Luke is told he will die, he (after his experience in the Tower of Rem) is determined to live for as long and happily as possible. The Big Bang will bring back Asch. This is what will happen, period. Jade is upset, because he can’t think of any way for Luke to survive. Everything points to Luke dying at the end of the game. Luke surviving would be a million to one chance.

And people look at this story and think, the million to one chance never happened, the person who rejected their fate and seized control of their life never overcame what should be impossible and returned to his loved ones and the one who was always going to survive even if he did absolutely nothing just … lived? Really? In a story about the futility of life, maybe, but then the ending should have been more explicit.

3) The hand twitch is difficult to explain, especially to people who go “it means Asch is aliiiiiive!,” because it’s purpose is symbolic and thematic, not practical. It’s hard to talk to people demanding a scientific explanation complete with references as to how the ending could possibly be Luke when Asch’s hand totally twitched, because there isn’t any. The theory above is an interesting probability, but the real reason is the hand twitch was necessary so that the player would understand what was happening. That Asch’s “life” was becoming a part of Luke. That Luke wasn’t just vacuuming up Asch’s molecules, thanks for the fonons bro!, but that this was serious moment, and Asch’s existence was helping Luke to live. It pays respect to the character. “we’ll become one” etc. Asch died because he refused to change, to take control of his life (anyone playing the game thinking Asch was driving anything really missed the point) and he was the exact same character in Eldrant that he was at the beginning. The contrast to how different Luke was is important. And when he finally did stop spinning his wheels in the past (claiming his name as Luke fon Fabre) his destiny did change: He died. Meanwhile, Luke lived because he refused to stay the same …and it was his actions that finally caused Asch to move.

4) I’m pretty sure the Grand Fonic Hymn had everything to do with Luke appearing in Tataroo Valley at precisely that moment, and it comes from a thing I’ve been trying to verbalize for a while.

See, despite what many Tales experts will claim, Tales of the Abyss has summon spirits and summoners. You never use them as a mechanic, but they exist. What are summon spirits in other games? They are sentient creatures composed of a type of mana, or magical particle. Ifrit is a sentient being composed of fire mana, etc. But that’s magic, in a magical world.

Abyss is a scientific world. Rather that fantasy, the world-building treats what is basically magic as natural phenomena. There is no mana, there is fonons. Scientifically measured and understood. The types are not mystical “elements,” they are numbered, first fonon, second fonon, etc. Don’t get me wrong, it’s still totally magic, but the atmosphere of the game world is different. In other games, there are summon spirits composed of pure magic that are like unto small gods. In Abyss, there are … observed phenomena of aggregate sentience, that is if fonons of the same type gather in a large and pure enough amount, the aggregation will obtain sentience, and be like a living thing. But they are exactly the same, just the game worlds and the people in them treat them differently.

Lorelai is an aggregate sentience. In other words Lorelai is a summon spirit. Yulia Jue made a pact with Lorelai, sealed by the jewel, the key, and the hymn. Yulia Jue made a pact with a summon spirit. Yulia was a summoner. She could communicate and work with Lorelai. Yulia used the power of the seventh fonon, the fonon that Lorelai is the aggregate sentience/summon spirit of, to do amazing things,

When Tear sang the Hymn in Tataroo valley, she was thinking of Luke. The anime makes this explicit; everyone was thinking of Luke. They were, unconsciously, calling to him. She sang the Hymn. Luke, wherever he was, has the sword and key. The elements of the pact. Luke has the same fonon frequency as Lorelai. In a nonscientific world, one might say he has the same energy, or even soul. He was summoned.

Not to say that that Luke is Lorelai or a summon spirit or anything silly like that. But I think it’s pretty clear that the connection between Lorelai and the Hymn is what brought him home, right then, when his friends were thinking of him, and calling for him.

Well, that was long. I’m glad someone else gathered most of this so I didn’t have to!

I love it when someone can verbalize exactly what is in my head and make it better. Thank you!

Just to add on to your points:

1) I completely agree with you that the ending is really not ambiguous. People who have taken Namco’s stance of the ending being “up to the player” have somehow interpreted it to mean ambiguity, but when you connect all the dots, it really isn’t as some people like to claim (and grossly exaggerate) it to be. And as you mentioned, Inception is a great example of an actual ‘ambiguous’ ending—there isn’t one side that has a wholly amount of ‘evidence’ over the other.

As you said, it’s clear that the developers have an answer, which they even admitted themselves. But instead of telling people that they want them to go with “what they want,” I’d rather that they have just told people to “figure it out” for themselves. That’s at least more “finite” than just leaving the ending completely “open.” From what I remember actually, after the game came out in Japan, most people had actually believed Mr. Ending to be Luke, but after the (obviously planted) question came up of whether it was Luke or Asch, and “whoever the player thinks came back, is the answer to the ending,” that’s when people started coming up with their own (and sometimes rather bizarre) theories.

2) Another great point. What you just explained is precisely why I adore Abyss’ story, leaps and bounds over the other Tales, if not over most other story-driven games in general. The problem, unfortunately, is that there’s no way to really explain and clarify this to people because, well, it’s all dependent on having one very specific view of the ending (which a lot of people don’t want to support for their own reasons)—and well, they’ll instead cling to the word of God (aka Namco) to justify their own interpretation of the ending.

But that specific interpretation, I feel, makes the story even more brilliant than what it seems on the surface. The Big Bang would’ve let Asch live had nothing happened at all. But due to the choices Luke and Asch each make, Luke is able to overturn his fate, and Luke taking control of his life is precisely why he succeeds over Asch. It has nothing to do with being a “happier” ending. It just simply goes with everything else the game stood for.

3) This was also my first impression of the hand twitch, as if Asch was still trying to make Luke live on in his very last moments. Though as you said, very hard to really explain how this ultimately favors Luke, which is why I gave my disclaimer when I posed my theory.

4) I did actually make that connection as well, that Tear was “summoning” Luke the same way Yulia probably would have summoned Lorelei. (Though some people use this as supporting the “Mr. Ending = Lorelei” theory, but I really don’t think it’s meant to be as literal, which I stated in my post. Tear is a descendant of Yulia as Luke is, metaphorically speaking, a descendant of Lorelei, at least at the end.)

I was thinking of making an addendum to my post concerning why the game needs a conclusive ending, but I think now I will just make a separate one. But I will definitely bring up your points when I do get around to it.

Again, thank you! I’m just glad there’s more people out there who also recognize the subtleties in the story when it’s Luke who comes back.

The handtwitch drives me nuts because it makes perfect sense, but is just so difficult to explain. It’s more about what feels right than something that has a practical explanation, especially for people locked into seeing the ending a certain way.

And I just really wanted to expound on the summons as represented in Abyss. A lot of people even after all this time don’t realize Lorelai is a summon spirit.

sistaofpeace1’s Ending Theory to Tales of the Abyss

sistaofpeace1:

Hello people and welcome to my ending theory to one of my favorite games of all time, Tales of the Abyss. Now, I completely and fully understand that the developers want players to basically come up with their own ending and just believe what they want. And it’s really Namco’s fault for trying to make the ending intentionally confusing and vague, however, I think there are many factors put in the game already that show what the developers truly intended—and that is what this post is about. I’ll admit, even after nearly eight years of trying to analyze the ending myself (I first beat the Japanese version of the game in Feb 2006), I’m still not 100% confident in my own theory and speculation due to Namco purposely not explaining some critical elements. But I’ll still share with you what I’ve come up with myself based on the game’s “science” and various dialogue said by certain characters—even what others deem to be “evidence” leaning toward other theories, but I will use those to show how it actually proves otherwise. So huge wall of text coming forth as I attempt to explain all of this in detail.

This post is divided up into the following:

I. In-game evidence (aka the Contamination Effect and the Big Bang)

II. Themes and the epilogue

III. In official supplementary materials

IV. Why other theories simply do not work

Read More

Reblogging for truths and so I don’t have to write this essay myself. Except I will now write some random additional things. This is pretty much exactly what I would say but a few extra bits so all my thoughts are in on one place.

1) Less theory and more like “what actually happened.” The whole “ambiguous” thing is just so ridiculous. In an ambiguous ending, both options get equal weight, both options complete the theme or message of the story (perhaps in opposite ways), and, most importantly, the creators of the story don’t have an answer. Tales of the Abyss clearly has an answer, is weighted in precisely one direction, and makes no sense thematically otherwise. The ending is not ambiguous in the slightest, it’s unexplained, and the player is encouraged to figure it out, not simply decide what they want.

Inception has an ambiguous ending. Either way you decide, the theme if the story, that “the dream is real to the one who dreams” is held up. The creators explicitly don’t know if the main character is dreaming at the end. The creators of Tales of the Abyss do know what happened, and only faffed around with what, exactly, would be shown to the player.

2) More on the ending being weighted toward Luke, I just have to question if people know how stories work. The game gives a problem: Luke is fated to die through the Big Bang. The theme of the game is Luke’s struggle to define himself and realize he needs no reason to exist, that just wanting to live is justification enough. Luke is set against his foil, Asch, who does not change as Luke does, in direct parallel.  When Asch is told (mistakenly) he will die, he becomes reckless and feels no escape from his fate. When Luke is told he will die, he (after his experience in the Tower of Rem) is determined to live for as long and happily as possible. The Big Bang will bring back Asch. This is what will happen, period. Jade is upset, because he can’t think of any way for Luke to survive. Everything points to Luke dying at the end of the game. Luke surviving would be a million to one chance.

And people look at this story and think, the million to one chance never happened, the person who rejected their fate and seized control of their life never overcame what should be impossible and returned to his loved ones and the one who was always going to survive even if he did absolutely nothing just … lived? Really? In a story about the futility of life, maybe, but then the ending should have been more explicit.

3) The hand twitch is difficult to explain, especially to people who go “it means Asch is aliiiiiive!,” because it’s purpose is symbolic and thematic, not practical. It’s hard to talk to people demanding a scientific explanation complete with references as to how the ending could possibly be Luke when Asch’s hand totally twitched, because there isn’t any. The theory above is an interesting probability, but the real reason is the hand twitch was necessary so that the player would understand what was happening. That Asch’s “life” was becoming a part of Luke. That Luke wasn’t just vacuuming up Asch’s molecules, thanks for the fonons bro!, but that this was serious moment, and Asch’s existence was helping Luke to live. It pays respect to the character. “we’ll become one” etc. Asch died because he refused to change, to take control of his life (anyone playing the game thinking Asch was driving anything really missed the point) and he was the exact same character in Eldrant that he was at the beginning. The contrast to how different Luke was is important. And when he finally did stop spinning his wheels in the past (claiming his name as Luke fon Fabre) his destiny did change: He died. Meanwhile, Luke lived because he refused to stay the same …and it was his actions that finally caused Asch to move.

4) I’m pretty sure the Grand Fonic Hymn had everything to do with Luke appearing in Tataroo Valley at precisely that moment, and it comes from a thing I’ve been trying to verbalize for a while.

See, despite what many Tales experts will claim, Tales of the Abyss has summon spirits and summoners. You never use them as a mechanic, but they exist. What are summon spirits in other games? They are sentient creatures composed of a type of mana, or magical particle. Ifrit is a sentient being composed of fire mana, etc. But that’s magic, in a magical world.

Abyss is a scientific world. Rather that fantasy, the world-building treats what is basically magic as natural phenomena. There is no mana, there is fonons. Scientifically measured and understood. The types are not mystical “elements,” they are numbered, first fonon, second fonon, etc. Don’t get me wrong, it’s still totally magic, but the atmosphere of the game world is different. In other games, there are summon spirits composed of pure magic that are like unto small gods. In Abyss, there are … observed phenomena of aggregate sentience, that is if fonons of the same type gather in a large and pure enough amount, the aggregation will obtain sentience, and be like a living thing. But they are exactly the same, just the game worlds and the people in them treat them differently.

Lorelai is an aggregate sentience. In other words Lorelai is a summon spirit. Yulia Jue made a pact with Lorelai, sealed by the jewel, the key, and the hymn. Yulia Jue made a pact with a summon spirit. Yulia was a summoner. She could communicate and work with Lorelai. Yulia used the power of the seventh fonon, the fonon that Lorelai is the aggregate sentience/summon spirit of, to do amazing things,

When Tear sang the Hymn in Tataroo valley, she was thinking of Luke. The anime makes this explicit; everyone was thinking of Luke. They were, unconsciously, calling to him. She sang the Hymn. Luke, wherever he was, has the sword and key. The elements of the pact. Luke has the same fonon frequency as Lorelai. In a nonscientific world, one might say he has the same energy, or even soul. He was summoned.

Not to say that that Luke is Lorelai or a summon spirit or anything silly like that. But I think it’s pretty clear that the connection between Lorelai and the Hymn is what brought him home, right then, when his friends were thinking of him, and calling for him.

Well, that was long. I’m glad someone else gathered most of this so I didn’t have to!